Medicine

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Unwritten history is impossible to decipher, and although studying the sketches, bony remains, and surgical instruments of early humans will reveal a lot, it's difficult to reconstruct their emotional attitudes toward illness and death. It's likely that as soon as they got to the point of thinking, they used trial and error to figure out which plants could be eaten, which plants were poisonous, and which plants had medicinal value. Folk medicine or domestic medicine, which is based primarily on the use of plant products or herbs, was developed in this manner and is still practised today.



However, it is not the end of the matter. Death and illness were not initially regarded as natural occurrences by humans. Common ailments including colds and constipation were recognised as a fact of life and treated with whatever herbal remedies were accessible. Serious and debilitating illnesses, on the other hand, were assigned to a separate division. There were mystical in nature. They may be the product of an enemy's hex, a malevolent demon's visitation, or the work of an insulted deity who had either projected something—a dart, a hammer, a worm—into the victim's body or abstracted something, normally the patient's soul. The drug was then used to entice t



Primitive doctors

Aside from the care of wounds and broken bones, folk medicine is perhaps the oldest feature of the healing practise, since primitive physicians demonstrated their experience by treating the entire human, spirit and body. And if treatments and medications had no physical impact on the body, they could make a patient feel better if both the healer and the patient trusted in their effectiveness. And current conventional practise will benefit from the placebo effect.

In ancient Egypt and the ancient Middle East

The invention of writing and the establishment of the calendar marked the beginning of written history. Just clay tablets containing cuneiform signs and seals, which were used by doctors in ancient Mesopotamia, provide evidence of early understanding. The Code of Hammurabi, written by a Babylonian king in the 18th century BCE, is preserved on a stone pillar in the Louvre Museum in France. The punishments for negligence were serious under this code, which included rules relating to the practise of medicine. “When the doctor kills the patient when removing an abscess, his hands shall be cut off,” for example; if the patient was a slave, the doctor was simply required to provide.

Ancient Indian medicine and the beliefs of the ancients

The invention of writing and the establishment of the calendar marked the beginning of written history. Just clay tablets containing cuneiform signs and seals, which were used by doctors in ancient Mesopotamia, provide evidence of early understanding. The Code of Hammurabi, written by a Babylonian king in the 18th century BCE, is preserved on a stone pillar in the Louvre Museum in France. The punishments for negligence were serious under this code, which included rules relating to the practise of medicine. “When the doctor kills the patient when removing an abscess, his hands shall be cut off,” for example; if the patient was a slave, the doctor was simply required to provide.


We hope you like it, and do not forget to write your opinions and suggestions in the comments, as they are of interest to us. And if you liked the article, do not forget to share it or publish it on social media



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