Types of students and learning styles

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Kinesthetic Educators

Kinesthetic learners are hands-on, participatory learners who tend to be physically involved in order to achieve their best educational results. Kinesthetic learners are often referred to as "tactile learners," although this is a misnomer; rather than relying solely on touch, they prefer to use all of their senses equally throughout the learning process. 


Students who perform well in the reading/writing modality have a high affinity for the written word as a learning tool. This encompasses all written material shared in class as handouts and PowerPoint slide shows, as well as the ability to synthesise course content by written assignments.  Since many information-rich sources on the internet are text-heavy, this method lends itself to conducting analysis online. 

Learners who are auditory

When auditory (or aural) learners are offered the ability to hear information conveyed to them vocally, they are most effective. Since students with this learning style may choose not to take notes during class in order to preserve their uninterrupted auditory focus, educators may mistakenly believe they are less committed than their peers. These pupils, on the other hand, may have just concluded that writing notes is a waste of time and that paying attention is a more important way to learn.

Learning habits

Learning habits are no exception. Few items in life fit neatly into neatly defined schema. Indeed, surveys suggest that between 50 and 70 percent of the population has affinities with a variety of learning types. These individuals are known as "multimodal learners," and they do well in classrooms where they are exposed to different learning types alternately or simultaneously.


However, just because students can excel with a variety of learning styles does not mean they should be exposed to more than one on a regular basis. Although today's media-rich world has made multimodal learning more accessible than ever before, new research suggests using caution and precaution when incorporating digital instructional design into the classroom. In general, multimedia should be seen as a tool to achieve a particular instructional purpose rather than an end in and of itself, and multimodal, immersive learning should be reserved for more complex topics rather than simple memorization and ability development.


We hope you like it, and do not forget to write your opinions and suggestions in the comments, as they are of interest to us. And if you liked the article, do not forget to share it or publish it on social media



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